Is Your “Diet” Harming Your Kidneys?

 

You have kidney disease, you want to eat healthy, and you’ve been told one of the best ways to do so is to eat a low sugar diet. In an effort to do so you turn to “diet” drinks (and foods), you look at the nutritional panel and see there are ZERO sugars present in the drink.

You have no reason to doubt that this food or drink is not healthy for you, you put your trust in the FDA (or your government) to make sure all foods and drinks that are “passed” are healthy and safe for you and your family… And so it will come as a shock when I tell you that studies have now proven diet drinks are harmful to your kidneys.

In a study conducted by Dr Julie Lin and Dr Gary Curhan of Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 3000 women over 11 years were studied to see what effect drinking two or more diet drinks had on kidney function.

After taking into consideration high blood pressure, smoking, diabetes, age, and heart disease, the clinical study clearly showed that two or more serves of diet drinks a day doubles the risk of more-rapid-than-normal kidney function decline. “In women with well-preserved kidney function, higher dietary sodium intake was associated with greater kidney function decline, which is consistent with experimental animal data that high sodium intake promotes progressive kidney decline.” said Dr Julie Lin.

What the study does not tell us however is what aspect of the diet drink actually causes the declining kidney function; the two possibilities being, the sodium content and the artificial sweetener aspartame. “While more study is needed, our research suggests that higher sodium and artificially sweetened soda intake are associated with greater rate of decline in kidney function.” said Dr Julie Lin.

Artificial Sweetener? More Like Artificial Poison
It is my belief however that the major player in causing the decline in kidney function is artificial sweeteners (especially aspartame – the most common artificial sweetener). The overwhelming proof and evidence shows that aspartame is in no way safe for human consumption at any level. read more

Baked Quinoa and Broccoli Frittata

 

Hello! Today I like to share with you a healthy and delicious recipe that not only will make your taste buds sing, but will also be protective of your kidney function and help support tissue alkalinity.

I know for many eating a healthy kidney diet can be the struggle, and so I hope this recipe can be another tool in your toolbox in beating kidney disease.

Baked Quinoa and Broccoli Frittata

This quick and easy dish provides an interesting twist on your common frittata.

Quinoa is a South American staple and is one of the few alkaline “grains” (technically it is a seed).  If you are sure what quinoa is or how to cook with it, don’t worry, if you can cook with rice, then you can cook with quinoa.

This recipes strengths lie in the fact it is gluten and dairy free, and soundly alkaline – all three being an important factor in maintain kidney health. Being “gluten free” is particularly important for those with IgA Nephropathy as it helps reduce the load on the immune system. Gluten is an “aggravator” to the immune system.

Alrightly, without further ado, here is your recipe for the day…

Ingredients (serves 4)

• 1 cup quinoa (measure before cooked)
• 2 cups broccoli florets
• ½ teaspoon celtic sea salt
• ¼ teaspoon crushed pepper
• 1 ½ cups soymilk
• 4 eggs
• Lemon wedge (optional)

Directions

1.   Preheat the oven to 180°C and brush a casserole dish with a thin layer of olive oil.
2.   Place the quinoa in a saucepan with 2 cups of water over medium heat and simmer for 15 minutes. Add the celtic sea salt while the quinoa is cooking. Most of the liquid should have disappeared after 15 minutes.
3.   Once cooked, stir through the quinoa, place the broccoli on top and turn off the cooker, leaving the saucepan on top.
4.   While the quinoa is cooking beat the eggs in a mixing bowl. Mix in the pepper and soymilk.
5.   Place the cooked quinoa in the casserole dish and cover with the egg and soymilk mixture. Bake for up to 45 minutes, removing from the oven when the dish has browned on top.
6.   Once cooked, sit the dish for 10 minutes and then cut into slices and serve.
Optional: Squeeze fresh lemon juice on top to your taste preference.

Nutritional Analysis (per serving)

  • Potassium: 531mg
  • Protein: 16g
  • Phosphorus: 361mg
  • Sodium: 419mg

This dish is great as it does not involve too many ingredients and is relatively simple to make. The other great thing is that it keeps well for a couple of the days, so you can enjoy the next day for lunch too!

Also don’t be shy in playing around with the flavours of this dish, add some spices, or chopped vegetables to make it even a bigger hit (e.g. mushrooms).

Please let me know in the comments section below how you get on with this kidney recipe; if you enjoyed it; and possibly ways to even make it better – though anything with broccoli for me is a winner (I’m a bit of a broccoli fiend.)

Thank you once again for stopping by, and look forward to chatting with you next week.

And don’t forget, if you have enjoyed this article, please click the “LIKE” or Share buttons below to show your support (They’re my kind of currency 🙂!)

Kidney Failure Symptoms Checklist: How Are Your Kidneys Really?

 

Checklist

If you suspect kidney disease, or have kidney disease, this may be the most important article you have read on the topic of kidney failure symptoms. I say this because unlike many articles on the internet regarding kidney failure symptoms, this article will help you assess the state of your kidney health via an online self-check list; rather than just listing a bunch of random symptoms, which will give you no guidance or direction.

But I before I go on any further, and this may seem counter-productive, I must state that any method of non-laboratory diagnosis has its flaws. So whatever ever method you may be using, whether it be my self-check list below, medical questionnaire assessments, iridology, TCM analysis, computerised electro scanners, or psychics, nothing will accurately diagnose your condition like proper blood work. If you suspect you have kidney disease, or are experiencing any type of symptoms that you are unsure about, please see your doctor immediately – no matter what these methods tell you.

…It is important to first note that many kidney failure symptoms could be easily confused with any number of illnesses, and this is because many of the initial kidney disease symptoms are superficial and wide-ranging. Therefore listing a bunch of symptoms in no order is pointless, you may have some symptoms, but how can you be certain the symptoms you are experiencing are caused by kidney disease?

It is this vagueness that I hope to eradicate (to the best of my ability) by providing a self-check list and a grading system, and, I hope by informing the wider public of the symptoms of this disease I can help many people avert its ‘silent’ progression.

The Kidney Failure Symptoms Self-Check List

How to use the kidney symptoms checklist:

  1. Scan the list of renal failure symptoms below, and circle the corresponding number (to the right) of each symptom you have experienced in the past 14 days.
  2. Once completed, add up all the numbers you have circled.
  3. Cross check the total number against the ‘Kidney Failure Symptoms Grading Index’ to find out your likelihood of kidney disease.

read more

The Ultimate A to Z Guide to Chronic Renal Failure (Part 2)

 

This article is a continuation of my previous article entitled The Ultimate A to Z Guide to Chronic Renal Failure (Part 1), in this article I continue where I left off and detail letters N through to Z. Enjoy…

 

N is for Natural Treatments
Ahhh my favourite topic! I LOVE natural medicines; there is something about working with the power of nature that really gets me really excited! (I’m a little weird I know)

There is a full gamut of natural remedies and techniques, such as herbal medicine, nutrition, diet, homeopathics, flower essences, and a whole lot more, that have for many of my clients, improved kidney function, reversed kidney disease, and safe-guarded from further chronic renal failure.

I have been using natural medicines now for over 10 years, and through that time I have learnt a thing or two, the best discovery was that by using certain natural medicines I was able to affect change in the health of my client’s kidneys and lives!

Side Note: This all started when my wife’s nanna was diagnosed kidney disease four years ago, and we had to find a solution. She was at stage three, bordering on stage 4, and well, thankfully today she does not have chronic renal failure any longer.

The important thing to note is this. If you have been recently diagnosed (or had chronic renal failure for many years for that matter) please know that there is an alternative out there that your doctor wouldn’t have discussed. You don’t have to put up with “There is nothing we can do… When your kidneys get bad enough, your options are dialysis and transplantation…”

When the world says, “Give up,” Hope whispers, “Try it one more time.” ~Author Unknown

If you would like to find out more of the exact program I use to help thousands of people world-wide improve their kidney health, please check out my site here.

O is for Om (Meditation)
Ommmmmmmm….Meditation

Meditating is any technique which enables us to relax our body and our mind, and to free our mind of unnecessary thoughts. Eastern civilizations have been practicing this for thousands of years; just “knowing” that it improves the health of the mind, body and soul. They often practiced to achieve certain outcomes e.g. rejuvenation of the mind and nervous system, to let go of disease-causing thought patterns, muscular relaxation and self-development.

Chronic renal failure responds dramatically to the practice of meditation, and for this reason it is recommended to become part of your daily or weekly routine.

Today studies now prove what the ancients already knew, showing the following physiological changes:

  • Slower heart rate
  • Slower breathing rate
  • Lowered cortisol levels in the blood
  • Increased alpha brain waves, a brain wave associated with relaxation
  • Among many other physiological changes

P is for Protein & Phosphorus
Protein: Another important nutrient one must monitor its consumption of, is Protein. Protein is a misunderstood nutrient when it comes to chronic renal failure, as in some situation one needs to reduce protein, and in others it needs to be increased. What to do? Well, first up you need to speak to your naturopath, nutritionist or doctor for the best requirements for your condition. They will be able to tell you exactly your protein needs based on your stage of chronic renal failure.

For a complete breakdown of the levels of protein you need to be consuming for your stage of kidney disease please see my in-depth article: The Definitive Guide on Protein and Kidney Disease

Phosphorus: The kidneys regulate the mineral phosphorus in the blood stream, and for that reason when one has chronic renal failure this ability can become impaired, causing phosphorus levels to rise. Phosphorus at “healthy” levels helps build strong teeth and bones (among many other benefits), but when levels become high, phosphorus can the opposite effect, by leaching out calcium from the teeth and bones. This “leeched” calcium also makes its way to the blood stream causing abnormal calcium deposits, and too much phosphorus can cause itchy skin, bone pain, heart issues, or even death.

The important thing to note is that not all sufferers of chronic renal failure will develop high phosphate levels, and therefore you need to always confirm your levels with a blood test.

To know the recommended phosphorus daily allowance for stage of kidney disease, please see this article.

Q is for Qi Gongchronic renal failure
Qigong is another practice that I recommend for those suffering with chronic renal failure, for it is rejuvenating qualities for the body and mind; which is oh so necessary for individuals with chronic renal failure.

What is Qigong? Qigong is the practice of aligning the breath, body, and mind as one, and harnessing and working with the vital force (Chi) that exists within and all around us. Through this, a deeper connection to yourself and life is established and greater awareness and peace is achieved. Although Qigong is not as well known as Tai Chi, Qigong and Tai Chi share a similar philosophy, technique, and origin. In fact many people mistake Qigong for Tai Chi when practiced.

In my blog post 10 Ways To Improve Kidney Function Without Leaving Home I talk more in depth about the benefits of Qigong in chronic renal failure, and provide a video showing how enhance your kidney energy through Qigong. read more

The Ultimate A to Z Guide to Chronic Renal Failure (Part 1)

 

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In today’s article I want to talk to you about chronic renal failure; what it is, what causes it, the best blood tests, and a whole lot more. However, today I want to do something a little different, I want to break it down in to an A to Z guide so you can quickly reference the major key topics – so in that way you have a valuable resource to refer back to in the future.

Interesting…

Chronic renal failure is an interesting condition, it affects 2 out of every 1,000 people in the United States; 11% of all deaths in Australia are due to, or associated with, renal failure; 20 to 30 percent of people with diabetes will develop kidney disease; 1 in 9 adults have a minimum of one renal failure sign or symptom; it is one the quickest growing diseases in the world… yet it is still largely not a condition that many understand, or have been appropriately informed about.

Definition:

But before I go into any specifics with this condition, I wanted to quickly define exactly what I am referring to when I say “Chronic Renal Failure”. For the purposes of this article, chronic renal failure means any dis-ease of the kidneys that causes diminishment of kidney function, as shown by an estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate test (eGFR). In contrast, the term “End Stage Renal Failure” only describes kidneys that have a kidney function of less than 15%.

The Ultimate A-Z Guide To Chronic Renal Failure

A is for Alkaline
Alkalinity is an important concept to understand and implement when dealing with chronic kidney failure. Alkalinity is a must for your body’s tissues to survive and thrive. In fact, your body will do anything it can to keep your blood pH in the narrow window of 7.35 to 7.45pH – your body will literally break down its bones for the calcium contained within them to keep your body alkaline!

Normally however, keeping the body acid/alkaline balance within your body is the job of the kidneys. When your kidneys begin to diminish in function so too does their ability to excrete the acid and maintain the alkalinity in your blood. Therefore eating an alkaline diet is the best way to protect and improve the health of your kidneys.

To add further strain on already strained kidneys, many of today’s lifestyle choices are acid forming as well as changes to our environment:

  • Diet: e.g. alcohol, sugar, coffee, red meat, grains
  • Chemicals: e.g. industrial chemicals, cleaning products, paint, makeup and cosmetics
  • Pesticides
  • Heavy metals
  • Excess exercise
  • Sedentary lifestyle
  • Smoking

For more information on alkalinity and the alkaline diet, please see my article here.

B is for Blood tests
I cannot emphasise how important it is to get your blood regularly tested. Blood tests help in the following ways:blood tests

  • Monitors the progression of your condition
  • Tracks that your treatments are working
  • Informs you of any abnormal developments in your health
  • Allows you to tailor your diet to suit your needs e.g. potassium, phosphorus, sodium, vitamin D, and calcium levels
  • By knowing the current state of your body, and understanding that state, you’re better equipped to make positive changes. It is shown people feel more in control and are more likely to make the changes when they understand their condition and all facets related to their condition.
  • It will show you your current percentage of kidney function

The best blood tests to assess your renal failure are:

  1. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)
  2. Creatinine
  3. 24hr creatinine clearance
  4. Urinalysis
  5. BUN
  6. Kidney biopsy
  7. Imaging

Please see my article here for a detailed description of each test in chronic renal failure: Top 7 Kidney Tests To Measure Your Kidney Function

Other important tests include: Potassium levels, Sodium levels, Phosphate levels, Vitamin D levels, Calcium levels, Parathyroid hormone levels, and Hemoglobin levels. read more