RSSArchive for April, 2011

Kidney Recipe: Lemon Chicken and Potato Salad

Kidney Recipe

Hi everybody, I hope those of you that celebrate Easter had a great one!

For me the Easter break has meant that I haven’t been able to write blog post as soon as I would have liked, so here I am today to rectify that! To be honest I am still playing catch up with all the work that has accumulated in this short space of time – which is crazy isn’t it? It has only been a few days.

Therefore today I thought a kidney recipe would be the perfect addition to my blog to help you on your way to kidney health, and give me a little time up my sleeve to answer all the emails in my inbox!

Today I have a delicious chicken salad kidney recipe for you – this provides you with kidney beneficial protein (unlike red meat) and alkalising benefits.

Lemon Chicken and Potato Salad Kidney Recipe

Ingredients

  • 250g green beans
  • 400g peeled kipfler potatoes
  • 400g chicken tenderloins or breast
  • 1/2 red onion, cut into wedges
  • 1/3 cup natural plain yoghurt
  • 2 tsp olive oil
  • 1 garlic clove, crushed
  • 3 tsp sumac (or lemon grated zest if not available)
  • 2 tbs fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tbs pistachio kernels, chopped
  • 1 cup mint leaves, fresh

Directions

  1. Mix the oil, garlic, lemon juice, and 1 teaspoon of sumac in a bowl. Then put in the chicken to coat evenly. You may also like to place this bowl in the fridge for 15 minutes to let the flavours infuse.
  2. In boiling water, cook the potatoes for 10 minutes (or to your liking); in the last 3 minutes add the beans for cooking. Once all is cooked to your liking, take off the heat immediately, drain, then run under cold water to take out the heat, and then drain again.
  3. Grab another bowl and place the sumac (or grated lemon zest) and yoghurt within. Stir.
  4. Cut the potatoes into inch thick slices (or 2 cm), place them in the bowl, and then add the onion, mint, and beans.
  5. Season to taste. Mix gently.
  6. Heat a cooking grill (or frypan with a tablespoon of olive oil) and cook the chicken for 3 minutes each side (or until cooked through).
  7. Serve on plates and top with yoghurt mixture and pistachio nuts.

Serves 4

I hope you enjoy the kidney recipe, and live healthy!

Herb In Focus – Hawthorn: Nature’s Heart Health Remedy

how to lower high blood pressure naturally

Today is the first of many articles I will write (from time to time) to focus on a herb, and detail its specific benefits for helping those with kidney disease. Today I will be featuring the herb Hawthorn.

Want to know how to lower high blood pressure naturally? Well hawthorn is the ideal companion of anyone experiencing high blood pressure (or any cardiovascular disease for that matter), which in the case of kidney disease this is always a favourable as so many individuals exhibit both kidney and heart conditions together.

With over 2000 years of medicinal use, hawthorn is truly a well established and well-known herb within any naturopath’s or herbalist’s toolkit. Names such as Dioscorides and Paracelsus (famous past physicians and botanists) praised hawthorn for its cardiovascular strengthening properties, and today this is proven through extensive scientific studies.

Plant Description
Hawthorn is a small thorny deciduous tree which grows to 5-14 metres (15-45 feet), is part of the Rosaceae family, and with roughly 280 species can sometimes cause confusion when sourcing the correct species of hawthorn for medicinal use. The best therapeutic species of hawthorn are: Crataegus monogyna, Crataegus spp, Crataegus laevigata, and Crataegus oxyacantha.

The leaves are dark green on top and lighter underneath, deeply lobed, with a length ranging between 2–4 cm (stay with me!). In the spring hawthorn features fragrant (though foul smelling!) red, pink, or white flowers. In autumn these flowers turn in to small, deep red, apple-shaped fruit. It is these “fruit” (berries) and leaves that form the most medicinally active part of the plant.

Many practitioners have their preference to which part of the plant they prefer to use, however all the latest studies show that it is the leaves that are most active. That is not to say the berries aren’t useful, hell no! It’s just a small tip that if you can source the leaves then do so, if not, that’s fine. In fact most products out at the moment contain only the berries or a blend of both, so sourcing a blend of both is by far the best.

Kidney Failure Treatment: What Doctors Don’t Tell You, But You Need To Know (Part 2)

kidney failure treatment

Today is part two of my three part series “Kidney Failure Treatment: What Doctors Don’t Tell You, But You Need To Know”. I hope you gained some valuable insights in the first article, but more importantly acted on those tips.

If you missed the first article, you may find it here: Kidney Failure Treatment Part 1

In today’s article I will be going through dialysis and transplants as a method of kidney failure treatment. These two treatments are the last resort that the medical community use, and rightly so, they can be extremely intrusive, costly, and complicated.

Each of these treatments comes with their own inherent risks and benefits, so it is important to understand what these are before making a decision that ultimately changes your life. As you would know by now I am an advocate of natural medicines over medical drugs and treatments, but that doesn’t mean I am anti-western medicine. I think there is a time and place for everything, and I believe that the fusion of western medicine with traditional medicine (natural medicine) is the best treatment possible for end-stage-kidney-failure.

Kidney Failure Treatment

Dialysis

Dialysis is always the first treatment presented to those with kidney failure – it is less intrusive and is considered easier on the client compared to transplant (though that is debateable).
There are currently two methods of ‘dialysis’, the most common being hemodialysis, the other known as peritoneal dialysis.

Kidney Disease Diet: Would You Like Kidney Disease With That…?

kidney diet

Fast-food. I know it sure is convenient, and there sure is something satisfying about hoeing into your favourite fast-food. But the fact of the matter is, that fast food is, well, garbage. Shocked? I’m sure.

*Sheepishly* For me, my weakness is fish and chips. Can’t get enough of that golden fried goodness :-). Though I am pleased to tell you I am on a 12 step program and my intake is down to only once a month – for those brave enough, I would love to hear what your vice is in the comment section below.

Of course not all fast-food is evil, but a study undertaken from the good people at The Division of Nephrology at MetroHealth Medical Centre in Cleveland, Ohio have sure made it look so (especially for those suffering from kidney disease).

The scientists wanted to see whether fast-food meals were compatible, at all, to the requirements of a healthy kidney disease diet. The four main nutritional requirements to take into consideration for a kidney disease diet are: potassium, protein, phosphorous and sodium.

They performed quite an intensive investigation, spanning 15 major fast-food chains. Examining ingredient lists and nutritional meal profiles, the scientists were able to accurately assess the levels of potassium, protein, phosphorous and sodium in each of the meals and side-dishes that each of the fast-food chains offer. There were 804 meals and 163 side-dishes in total.

You ready for the scary part (the results)?

Out of the 804 meals only 16% of them were deemed OK on all counts! The side-dishes only slightly better coming in at 17%.

Also, there were no acceptable meals at 3 fast-food chains, and no acceptable side-dishes at 5 fast-food chains.