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Top 7 Tips For A Healthy Renal Diet

renal diet

Today I wanted to clear up a few things in regards to what constitutes a healthy renal diet. I receive emails daily from confused and at their “wits end” kidney disease sufferers, wanting to know what they can eat. Especially what they CAN eat, not what they CAN’T eat (fair enough too).

This problem lays not in whether or not the right information is out there, but unfortunately in that all the good information has been diluted by all the garbage out there. Mass article writers, without any medical training, and even worse, (some) large kidney health organisations are to blame. Articles are prepared to supply a demand, but are not based on any proper healthy renal diet knowledge.

A diet can be healthy for one person, and harmful to another, a diet can be deemed healthy in terms of the right proportions of carbohydrates, fats, and protein, but totally miss the mark in taking into account foods that have a directed negative impact to the kidneys. This is the problem, and this why you are reading one article that says “X”, and another that says “Y”.

And so my goal today is to provide reliable, trustworthy renal diet information based on sound naturopathic and nutritional teachings to provide you with the top 7 tips on how to eat a healthy renal diet – so that you may at least have your foundations right; because without healthy dietary foundations, then any renal failure diet guidelines you follow… will fail.

Here Are My Top 7 Healthy Renal Diet Tips:

1. Consume: Everyone is telling you want you can’t eat, so I decided to tell you first what you can eat. Nothing’s better to knock the wind out of your sails while you are trying to come to terms with your current health situation, than to be faced we a wall of “Can’t have’s”, and “Should not’s”.

The list of foods below is deemed “healthy” in kidney disease, but also some of the foods are especially beneficial for kidney disease. These foods are marked with an asterix*.

Fruits: Apples, without skin; Apricot; Blueberries*; Grapes, red or green; Peach; Pears, asian; Pineapple; Plums; Raspberries*; Strawberries; Watermelon*.
Vegetables: Asparagus*; Cabbage, red; Cauliflower; Celery; Garlic; Lettuce, iceberg; Mushrooms; Onion; Parsley; Radishes; Mung beans, sprouted.
Protein: Fish*; Chicken; Tempeh*; Tofu*.
Miscellaneous: Carob (good alternative to chocolate); Flaxseed Oil*; Hummus; Popcorn, air-popped; Rice, white; Sea Salt; Olive Oil; Olives; Horseradish; Tapioca pearls; Oregano; Curry Powder; Sesame seed kernels; Paprika; Macadamia nuts.

Of course there are more foods than this that you can eat while suffering with renal failure, the difference being is that these foods are “healthy”. It is also important to note that these foods also satisfy the requirements of potassium, phosphorus, and sodium content for renal diet (as explained below), but with most things in life, you can have too much of a good thing – therefore the foods are healthy when eaten at normal servings sizes per day. Don’t overdo anything, moderation is the key.

2. Avoid: Unfortunately this tip cannot be avoided, there are simply foods that are downright bad for your kidneys, and these need to be removed from your renal diet. Here are a list of foods deemed “bad” for kidney disease, and therefore should be avoided in your renal diet:
Red meat: See my article on negative effects of red meat here
Dairy: this includes, milk, butter, cream, ice-cream, yoghurt, and all dairy containing pre-made products.
Alcohol: ALL alcohol, including red wine.
Gluten: is found in flour based products; and therefore in the following grains: wheat, rye, spelt, kamut, oats, and barley. Safe gluten FREE grains and alternatives include: rice, corn, amaranth, millet, quinoa, sorghum, teff, and buckwheat.
Highly processed foods
Sugar

There are many more foods that I could list, but these main categories encompass the best part of them. If you can follow an unprocessed, whole food renal diet, then meal times will be a breeze. If you resist change, and resort to processed, take-away, and pre-packaged foods, then you will struggle, and fail to realise the benefits that a healthy renal diet can have on you and your kidneys.

10 Ways To Improve Kidney Function Without Leaving Home

kidney function

There is a saying I love: “Spirit is simple, the Mind makes things complex”, and for me it is no different with healing. Your body wants to heal, there is nothing that it wants to do more; it was designed to heal.

Improving Your Kidney Function Can Be Simple

So you see for many, improving kidney function doesn’t need to be difficult. In most cases, simply by stepping to the side and getting out of your own way, checking your thoughts, fears, and excuses at the door, you can catalyse massive changes in your health, by simply allowing the healing to take place.

Rubbing Lanterns Won’t Help Improve Your Kidney Function, But Here’s What Can…

Now stay with me… I am not saying that that you can cure all by thinking just happy thoughts, wishing, and “getting out of the way”, no definitely not. There are many practical things you can do every day, with little to no fuss that are very effective in helping increase kidney function. Very helpful indeed.

Note: thinking positive however sure won’t hurt, in fact it will go along way; your mindset is the single biggest determining factor on how quickly you heal.

… So in tune with today’s theme of simplicity, I would like to share with you 10 effortless tips that can be applied immediately to help your kidney function, no need to leave home, and no need to spend a dime.

How To Improve Kidney Function In 10 Easy Steps

OK, let’s begin shall we?

1.    The Water Hydration Technique: You know how most of us generally go for long periods without water, become thirsty (and dehydrated) and scull the next available glass in about 30 seconds? Have you ever thought what this does to your body? No? I don’t blame you.

The actual fact of the matter is that every time you a drink a glass of water (or any fluid) in a hurry, you are placing pressure on kidney function. How? Well, seeing as one of the functions of the kidneys is to keep the fluid levels in the blood stream balanced, by drinking a full glass of water at once you are essentially dumping a large amount of water into the blood stream, which the kidneys now need to balance out (i.e. increase urine production). By drinking slowly, a mouthful at a time, you reduce the pressure on the kidneys and increase hydration. Sound too simple to do any good? Good. Now try it.

2.    Sunshine: As you are probably aware, when sunlight touches the skin, light sensitive receptor cells are activated to produce the active form of vitamin D. Vitamin D has many benefits in the body, the main benefits being: cancer prevention, immune system enhancement, bone health, and regulation of phosphorus and calcium levels (which is important in kidney disease).

how to increase kidney function

Did you know then that one of the key functions of kidneys is to active vitamin D too? True. By spending just 15 mins a day under the light of the sun, you can let the sun and your skin do all the work. Your kidneys will be saved the extra work, and at the same time you get to enjoy the open air.

The other important thing to note is that if your kidney function has deteriorated too far, then your kidneys will not be able to produce enough active vitamin D anyway, making sunshine all the more necessary.

Low levels have been linked to diabetes, kidney disease, cancer, and heart disease. People experiencing kidney disease, coupled with low vitamin D levels, have a 26 percent greater risk of dying than those with sufficient levels of vitamin D.

Have your vitamin D levels tested with your next visit at your doctors:

Optimal reference range for healthy individuals:
– US measurement: 50 to 70 ng/mL
– World measurement: 125 to 175 nmol/L

Optimal reference range for treating heart disease, cancer, and kidney disease:
– US measurement:70 to 80 ng/mL
– World measurement: 175 to 200 nmol/L

Is the sun shining where you are right now? If yes, jump outside!

7 Easy Ways To Lower Creatinine Levels Naturally

creatinine levels

I get asked a lot about creatinine; what is it, what causes high creatinine levels, and how to lower it naturally? It’s understandable, creatinine levels are looked upon as the best determining factor of the health of your kidneys, and is routinely tested for and discussed by your doctor.

But I must warn you, lowering creatinine SHOULD NOT be your ultimate goal, it is only secondary to the bigger picture… (keep reading to find out why).

So What is Creatinine?

•    Creatinine is a waste product of the major energy metabolite creatine.
•    Normal creatinine serum blood levels are:
–    0.6 to 1.2 mg/dl in males (53 to 106 umol/L)
–    0.5 to 1.1 mg/dl in females (44 to 97 umol/L)
•    Creatinine is usually found in higher quantities (within the blood) in young adults, and lesser quantities in the elderly.
•    Those with one kidney will have higher than “normal” levels of creatinine circulating in their blood (roughly 1.8 mg/dl or 160 umol/L).
•    Creatinine can be tested for via a blood sample or via a urine sample. On its own a blood sample is more accurate than a urine sample, though combining them together to form what is called a creatinine clearance test (both blood and urine) is the most accurate test.
•    High creatinine levels occur due to any number of diseases that cause the kidneys to shut down, including dehydration, shock, congestive heart failure, and bladder outlet obstruction.
•    There are no definitive symptoms that are caused by high creatinine levels, though the following could be possibly linked: fatigued, shortness of breath, feeling dehydrated, and confusion.

Interesting stuff? Great! I hope you won’t be disappointed then when I say to you “let’s move on to the next section”, because you have learnt all there is (worth) to know about creatinine. I would like to tell you more about creatinine, but really that is all you need to know. That’s the crux of it.

What I would really like to discuss next is the substance that creatinine is a by-product of… creatine.

If you are a gym junkie, or know someone that is, you probably have come across creatine before. Creatine is touted by many body builders as the best natural substance for increasing energy reserves – especially for the explosive sports (because of its role in ATP production).

Creatine is naturally produced by the body and the majority of it is stored within the muscles (up to 95%). The body does this through the synthesis of the amino acids L-arginine, glycine, and L-methionine via the liver, and because the body can make its own, creatine itself is not essential in the diet. The dietary source of creatine however is any animal meat, such as beef, chicken, and fish. Providing up to 1 gram a day of creatine for the typical “meat-eater”.

As previously mentioned, creatine has a key role to play in the production of ATP. This occurs in the most important energy pathway of the body, known as the Kreb’s Cycle, or the Citric Acid Cycle.  The average human body uses over 2000mg of creatinine a day to fuel this important biochemical pathway, for the purposes of producing the most vital energy source of the body.

… OK, so now that we understand a little more about creatine, and that creatine is a necessary molecule, we can now delve a little deeper into creatinine levels and how to lower them.

The Importance of Creatinine Levels

After many years study, and lengthy clinical trials, creatinine was found to be the best indicator of kidney function. Why? Well, there are a few reasons for this, and they are as follows:

The Definitive Guide on Protein and Kidney Disease

protein and kidney disease

Hi all! Today I wanted to talk about protein. Protein as most would know is at the heart of much discussion when it comes to treating and managing kidney disease, but for many it still remains a mystery. Questions such as: Does protein cause further kidney damage? How much should I take during each stage of kidney disease? And what are the best sources of protein? Are just a few of the questions I get commonly asked about protein and kidney disease. All of which I want to clarify and answer for you today (and more).

… With any topic is important to understand the fundamentals, so before I can start saying have X amount of protein at stage 4 kidney disease, you really need to know what the heck protein is! This is important because it gives you a deeper understanding of how your body works and interacts with its environment, and because of this you have far greater chance of following and sticking to the recommendations.

This article is a result of two of my awesome followers (Steven and Mark) asking a question on my facebook fan page; I created my facebook fan page to build a community, for people to “mingle”, chat with each other, pass ideas around, learn, discover, keep up to date with all my latest articles and information, and of course, a place to interact with me and ask questions. You can find me on my facebook fan page here: http://www.facebook.com/kidneycoach
(Remember to click the “LIKE” button near the top of the page to get access to the community)

So What The Heck Is Protein?

To me proteins are simply amazing. Proteins are literally the building blocks of our body, plus they perform what seems every biological function in our body. To demonstrate this, here are just some of the most important functions performed by proteins:
•    Blood Clotting – fibrin is a protein in the blood which causes the blood to coagulate, and therefore stop bleeding.
•    Carrier Proteins – haemoglobin is a “carrier” protein that carries oxygen throughout the body.

Hyperparathyroidism Treatment: Top 7 Natural Treatments For Secondary Hyperparathyroidism

hyperparathyroidism treatment

Have you been struggling to find clear & concise hyperparathyroidism treatment information on the internet? If so, you’re not alone.

For a lot of people experiencing kidney failure, hyperparathyroidism is by far one of the most puzzling of all complications – this is somewhat due to the fact that most people are unaware that there is even such a gland that exists in the body, but mostly due to the fact there is hardly any information out there on how to treat hyperparathyroidism effectively (and naturally).

It is therefore my goal with this blog post to demystify hyperparathyroidism treatment, and to provide a quality resource of information you can refer back to treat hyperparathyroidism naturally. I’ve made sure I have given you 7 of my best tips on how to reverse it.

Getting To Know Your Parathyroid Gland

Before we can treat parathyroid disease we need to know then, what it is, and its function.
The parathyroid gland is actually a collection of glands situated in the neck, behind the thyroid gland – which lies over the voice box. There are four parathyroid glands in total (though some individuals can be born with more), and surprisingly all four of them are the size of a grain of rice! It blows my mind that such small glands can have such an influence on the body.

Function…

The only function of the parathyroid gland is to manage calcium levels within the blood; this is an important job, as your entire nervous and muscular systems functionality depends on it. Our nervous system literally communicates from the presence of calcium, or I could say one nerve communicates to another nerve through the electrical conductivity of calcium. Not only that, but calcium is also required for muscular function, particularly muscular contraction – magnesium on the other hand relaxes muscles.

So What Does The Parathyroid Do?

Well, the parathyroid gland is like a 24 hour calcium monitor, when the gland detects that blood calcium levels have dropped under a certain amount, they produce parathyroid hormone (PTH).
The goal of the parathyroid hormone is to increase circulating blood levels of calcium. It does this in four ways:
1. PTH causes the skeletal bones to breakdown and release calcium in to the blood stream
2. PTH increases absorption of calcium via the intestines by activating vitamin D (this activation occurs within the kidneys)
3. PTH increases reabsorption of calcium via the kidneys
4. PTH increases the excretion of phosphate in the urine. Phosphate inhibits the rise of calcium in the blood. Both calcium and phosphorus work on a see-saw effect – when one is up the other is low.

That all make sense? Good.

So How Does It All Go Wrong?

Because this website is dedicated to helping those with kidney disease, we’ll just concentrate on the issues that relate and affect you… Hyperparathyroidism can be caused by a number of ways (benign tumour growth, hyperplasia, and carcinoma) but when one has kidney disease it occurs for a number of different reasons. These different reasons cause what is termed “secondary hyperparathyroidism”, because they cause hyperparathyroidism indirectly. As you will soon see.

Note: This is where it is important to pay attention as it is these causes we turn in to the basis of our hyperparathyroidism treatment => which leads to healing.

The Causes Of Secondary Hyperparathyroidism (remember hyperparathyroidism treatment starts from here)

1. When the kidneys begin to decline, their ability to remove phosphate from the blood also declines: As you may remember phosphate acts as an antagonist to calcium, so when high levels of phosphate are in the blood supply, there are low levels of calcium. This in turn will cause the parathyroid gland to produce more PTH to increase calcium levels.
2. Kidneys on the decline also have trouble converting vitamin D to its most biologically active form. This in turn reduces absorption of calcium via the intestines.

Therefore in kidney disease hyperparathyroidism is caused by low active forms of Vitamin D, and high phosphate levels… which cause low calcium, and therefore an overactive parathyroid!

What Are The Symptoms and Problems Associated With Secondary Hyperparathyroidism?

The main problem with this type of hyperparathyroidism is that calcium and phosphorus bind to together. This binding causes bone disease because calcium is taken from the bones, making them weak and brittle, and then calcifies in various parts of the body. It is this calcification that causes most of the problems. Calcification is essentially deposits of calcium phosphate in places where it should not occur.

hyperparathyroidism treatments