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The Definitive Guide on Protein and Kidney Disease

protein and kidney disease

Hi all! Today I wanted to talk about protein. Protein as most would know is at the heart of much discussion when it comes to treating and managing kidney disease, but for many it still remains a mystery. Questions such as: Does protein cause further kidney damage? How much should I take during each stage of kidney disease? And what are the best sources of protein? Are just a few of the questions I get commonly asked about protein and kidney disease. All of which I want to clarify and answer for you today (and more).

… With any topic is important to understand the fundamentals, so before I can start saying have X amount of protein at stage 4 kidney disease, you really need to know what the heck protein is! This is important because it gives you a deeper understanding of how your body works and interacts with its environment, and because of this you have far greater chance of following and sticking to the recommendations.

This article is a result of two of my awesome followers (Steven and Mark) asking a question on my facebook fan page; I created my facebook fan page to build a community, for people to “mingle”, chat with each other, pass ideas around, learn, discover, keep up to date with all my latest articles and information, and of course, a place to interact with me and ask questions. You can find me on my facebook fan page here: http://www.facebook.com/kidneycoach
(Remember to click the “LIKE” button near the top of the page to get access to the community)

So What The Heck Is Protein?

To me proteins are simply amazing. Proteins are literally the building blocks of our body, plus they perform what seems every biological function in our body. To demonstrate this, here are just some of the most important functions performed by proteins:
•    Blood Clotting – fibrin is a protein in the blood which causes the blood to coagulate, and therefore stop bleeding.
•    Carrier Proteins – haemoglobin is a “carrier” protein that carries oxygen throughout the body.

Kidney Recipe: Healthy Baked Rice Pudding with Berries

kidney recipe - rice pudding with berries

Look I know I am guilty of it, and I sure bet you are too… Sometimes you just get over eating healthy and crave something sweet. The great thing however is you don’t need to be unhealthy while doing it. There are plenty of options (available in your local health store right now) to replace unhealthy sugar, with healthy natural sweeteners.

The most common (and best) is Stevia. Stevia is a plant, stevia is natural, and stevia is definitely NOT created in some laboratory. It is 200 times sweeter than sugar without the calories, and also helps regulate blood levels. How awesome is that? Guilty pleasures here we come!

Note: On the other hand, avoid artificial sweeteners like the plague! These are some of the most poisonous substances around. They are linked to cancer, neurological problems, psychiatric side-effects, fatigue, weight gain, and many others. And frankly, they should be banned from our food. Aspartame for example converts into formaldehyde (embalming agent) and formic acid (found in the stings of ants and other insects) when it is digested.  But that is a whole other article. Artificial sweeteners include: Aspartame, Equal ™, Sucralose, Splenda (TM), Acesulfame K, Saccharin, and Neotame.

Today I thought I would give you a recipe that will help stop those cravings, be kind to your kidneys, and not give you an unhealthy hit of sugar.

Healthy Baked Rice Pudding – Kidney Disease Recipe

This recipe is an oldie but a goodie. It is simple to make, requires few ingredients, and is often a childhood memory favourite.
Let’s dig in shall we?

Ingredients (serves 4)
•    220g ( 1cup) short grain rice (such as Aborio rice)
•    500ml water
•    2 eggs, beaten
•    500ml (2 cups) Soy or Rice milk (preferably rice milk)
•    10 drops liquid vanilla stevia extract (to taste) – if using stevia powder, use ½ teaspoon
•    1 teaspoon vanilla essence
•    200g mixed fresh or frozen berries
•    Pinch ground nutmeg
•    Flaked toasted almonds (optional)

Baking Directions
1.    Preheat oven to 160 C.
2.    Bring to boil water in a large saucepan (3 litre), and then add in rice. Stir rice often to avoid sticking on the base of the pan. Cook rice on a gentle simmer until tender (15-25 minutes).
3.    Mix well in a large bowl, the beaten eggs, rice milk, vanilla essence, and stevia. Stir in rice and berries.
4.    Pour mixture into a baking dish (e.g. 20x30cm).
5.    Place baking dish into the oven and bake for 30 minutes; after 30 minutes stir pudding and add nutmeg and almond flakes. Bake for another 30 minutes.
6.    Rest for 5 minutes and then serve.

And Viola!

This dish does take a little while to create (up to 90 minutes); however 60 minutes of this is just oven time. So put it on as you are preparing dinner and then set and forget!

I really hope you find this an enjoyable dessert option. As sometimes changing your diet can be… well, let’s just say, a challenge.

Keep up the good work with your kidney diet and you will sure see improvements in your health and kidney function.

If you enjoyed this kidney recipe please be sure to click the “Like” button below, and leave a comment.

To Your Endless Health,
Duncan

Kidney Recipe: Lemon Chicken and Potato Salad

Kidney Recipe

Hi everybody, I hope those of you that celebrate Easter had a great one!

For me the Easter break has meant that I haven’t been able to write blog post as soon as I would have liked, so here I am today to rectify that! To be honest I am still playing catch up with all the work that has accumulated in this short space of time – which is crazy isn’t it? It has only been a few days.

Therefore today I thought a kidney recipe would be the perfect addition to my blog to help you on your way to kidney health, and give me a little time up my sleeve to answer all the emails in my inbox!

Today I have a delicious chicken salad kidney recipe for you – this provides you with kidney beneficial protein (unlike red meat) and alkalising benefits.

Lemon Chicken and Potato Salad Kidney Recipe

Ingredients

  • 250g green beans
  • 400g peeled kipfler potatoes
  • 400g chicken tenderloins or breast
  • 1/2 red onion, cut into wedges
  • 1/3 cup natural plain yoghurt
  • 2 tsp olive oil
  • 1 garlic clove, crushed
  • 3 tsp sumac (or lemon grated zest if not available)
  • 2 tbs fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tbs pistachio kernels, chopped
  • 1 cup mint leaves, fresh

Directions

  1. Mix the oil, garlic, lemon juice, and 1 teaspoon of sumac in a bowl. Then put in the chicken to coat evenly. You may also like to place this bowl in the fridge for 15 minutes to let the flavours infuse.
  2. In boiling water, cook the potatoes for 10 minutes (or to your liking); in the last 3 minutes add the beans for cooking. Once all is cooked to your liking, take off the heat immediately, drain, then run under cold water to take out the heat, and then drain again.
  3. Grab another bowl and place the sumac (or grated lemon zest) and yoghurt within. Stir.
  4. Cut the potatoes into inch thick slices (or 2 cm), place them in the bowl, and then add the onion, mint, and beans.
  5. Season to taste. Mix gently.
  6. Heat a cooking grill (or frypan with a tablespoon of olive oil) and cook the chicken for 3 minutes each side (or until cooked through).
  7. Serve on plates and top with yoghurt mixture and pistachio nuts.

Serves 4

I hope you enjoy the kidney recipe, and live healthy!

Kidney Disease Diet: Would You Like Kidney Disease With That…?

kidney diet

Fast-food. I know it sure is convenient, and there sure is something satisfying about hoeing into your favourite fast-food. But the fact of the matter is, that fast food is, well, garbage. Shocked? I’m sure.

*Sheepishly* For me, my weakness is fish and chips. Can’t get enough of that golden fried goodness :-). Though I am pleased to tell you I am on a 12 step program and my intake is down to only once a month – for those brave enough, I would love to hear what your vice is in the comment section below.

Of course not all fast-food is evil, but a study undertaken from the good people at The Division of Nephrology at MetroHealth Medical Centre in Cleveland, Ohio have sure made it look so (especially for those suffering from kidney disease).

The scientists wanted to see whether fast-food meals were compatible, at all, to the requirements of a healthy kidney disease diet. The four main nutritional requirements to take into consideration for a kidney disease diet are: potassium, protein, phosphorous and sodium.

They performed quite an intensive investigation, spanning 15 major fast-food chains. Examining ingredient lists and nutritional meal profiles, the scientists were able to accurately assess the levels of potassium, protein, phosphorous and sodium in each of the meals and side-dishes that each of the fast-food chains offer. There were 804 meals and 163 side-dishes in total.

You ready for the scary part (the results)?

Out of the 804 meals only 16% of them were deemed OK on all counts! The side-dishes only slightly better coming in at 17%.

Also, there were no acceptable meals at 3 fast-food chains, and no acceptable side-dishes at 5 fast-food chains.

7 Reasons Why You Should Eat Asparagus To Halt Your Kidney Disease

asparagus kidney disease
Asparagus has been used as a medicinal food/herb since before the time of Christ; even its botanical name points to this, Asparagus officinalis. Officinalis is given in acknowledgment to its “official” use as a therapeutic herb. This highly sought after and valued herb is native to both European and Asian cultures; and this is shown in many texts based on botany and herbal medicine findings throughout the regions.

Asparagus is most well known for its specific action on all of the urinary system (kidneys and bladder), the most well known being:

1.      Helps support and facilitate kidney function

2.      Increases urine production (diuretic)

3.      Soothing to the urinary system

4.      Anti-edema – especially with excess fluid from around the heart

5.      Kidney and bladder cleanser

6.      Boosts cellular action in the kidneys

7.      Breaks up uric acid – therefore excellent for gout and kidney stones

*Best avoided in conditions where the kidneys are chronically inflamed (e.g. nephritis), and not to be eaten in excess.

Others actions include: Lowers blood pressure (due to diuretic action), bitter (stimulates digestion), laxative (due to fiber), blood purifier, anti-rheumatic (removes uric acid), anti-parasitic, calming, promotes fertility, beneficial for all aspects of the female reproductive system (highly beneficial for men too).

The magic of this humble plant comes down to many naturally occurring chemicals; unlike western medicine that just singles out one chemical:

  • Asparagin
  • Asparagosdies
  • Asparagusic acid
  • Bitter principles: officinalisins
  • Flavonoids (rutin, quercetin, kaempferol)
  • Glycolic acid
  • Glycosides
  • Saponins
  • Tyrosin
  • Including: Vitamin A, B, C, E, folic acid, calcium, iron, phosphorus, potassium, zinc, selenium, iodine, magnesium, manganese, sulphur, silicon

You see the beauty of natural medicine is all in the synergism of all the chemicals in the plant, nature has been running its own “clinical trials” for the past few billion years, and has come up with the best combination of chemicals to help those that walk the earth. And the beautiful part is that once ingested, the body gets to choose which natural chemicals it needs – as opposed to being forced in one direction (i.e. western drugs). Check out this video called The Orderly Chaos of Nature for more information on how plants give man ‘selective’ therapeutic qualities.

Another important factor that this plant “brings to the table” (pardon the pun), is that it is highly alkaline. Now if you have read any of my stuff before you’ll know just how important it is to alkalise your body when you have kidney disease (any other chronic condition for that matter). Asparagus does this so well that it is even used in some cancer therapies just for that! It’s the high ammonia content that is working that here.