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The link between Chronic Kidney Disease and Coeliac Disease

https://www.fau.eu/2017/08/07/news/research/important-messenger-substances-in-the-immune-system/

Coeliac Disease might not be one of the first things that comes to mind when we hear the term “Chronic Kidney Disease”, but there are some interesting links between the two diseases, and the increasing incidence of Coeliac Disease globally makes this a topic worth discussing, especially for those of you who have been diagnosed with either disease, or have a family history of them.

 

Coeliac Disease is on the rise…

The estimated rate of Coeliac Disease worldwide is 1%. That’s 1 in every 100 people. The fact that this rate is increasing and that there is a strong genetic link suggest that we can expect this figure to rise. The fact that we do not understand the mechanisms responsible for this increase means there is not a lot we can do at this stage to prevent it.

 

CD vs CKD…

Coeliac Disease is a complex and as yet not well understood autoimmune disease, however the predisposing factors are clear. Sufferers must experience a combination of genetic, immune and environmental factors for the disease to develop. It cannot develop without dietary exposure to the protein gluten, and can only be managed by removing this trigger.

 

Chronic Kidney Disease, although the majority of cases can be attributed to high blood pressure and diabetes, can develop as a result of many different factors, including autoimmune conditions, urinary tract infections, congenital malformations (meaning they are present at birth), physical obstructions of the urinary tract or prostatitis, and many other inflammatory and genetic conditions. Diet and nutrition can be of great benefit in reversing kidney disease as we know, but it is rarely the direct cause of the condition.

 

The conditions do not appear related do they? But a cohort study published by Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, which investigated the link between any form of glomerulonephritis, dialysis treatment and kidney transplantation and Coeliac Disease, has found statistical significance associating CD with an increased risk of Glomerulonephritis and renal failure.

https://academic.oup.com/ndt/article/21/7/1809/1821933

On the surface, the 2 diseases appear to be completely unrelated, so let’s look below the surface…

 

What are the links between the diseases?

In a nutshell, it appears that immune characteristics are at the core of the connection between these 2 common and very serious diseases.

There is currently a lot of scientific interest in the gut (our gastrointestinal tract), it’s mechanisms of immune regulation and that factors of modern life that present a threat to the delicate balance that it serves to maintain. In the gut resides the gut-associated lymphoid tissue, or GALT. This makes up around 70% of our body’s immune cells – 70%! If this balance is compromised therefore, so is our immune system and its’ ability to protect us from disease. I will not go into too much depth about the role of GALT in this article, and to be honest there is still an awful lot we do not yet know about what goes on in there! But here is what we do know about the gut, and the similarities that have been found between Coeliac Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease sufferers.

 

Activated Immune System 

The mucosal immune system exists in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract and serves as our first line of defence against harmful pathogens, just as our skin does. It is an entire ecosystem made up of a complex network of immune cells and beneficial bacteria. Like any ecosystem, it relies on adequate nutrition, hydration and other factors to thrive and maintain homeostasis, or ‘balance’. When this barrier is compromised, protective mechanisms are initiated, one of which is the production and secretion of Secretory Immunoglobulin A (IgA). Almost 100% of Coeliac Disease patients have these antibodies present, and it appears that this same mucosal immune mechanism is also active in many forms of glomerulonephritis.

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1365-2249.1992.tb07947.x

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fimmu.2016.00240/full

Gut permeability 

Tight junctions are part of the structural component of the mucosal immune system in the gut wall. They prevent toxins and harmful bacteria from entering the blood stream. Essentially, it’s what separates our internal environment from the outside world, so it’s pretty important! If these tight junctions are damaged, unwanted pathogens enter the systemic circulation and cause inflammation and oxidative stress throughout the body. This has been linked, as both a cause and effect, to generalised autoimmune diseases including Coeliac Disease.

Studies have shown that a loss in kidney function can also reduce the effectiveness of the intestinal barrier, allowing pathogens to enter the bloodstream and potentially increase the decline of kidney function. Conversely, an impaired intestinal barrier can potentially lead to autoimmune kidney diseases in susceptible individuals due to the inflammation and oxidative stress caused by the failure of the body’s first line of defence.

 

Image source: https://uncexchanges.org/2017/04/03/leaky-gut-a-potential-contributor-to-the-brain-gut-microbiota-axis/

https://academic.oup.com/ndt/article/16/3/513/1823041

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6071212/

Auto-antibodies 

What are auto-antibodies you ask? These are similar to the antibodies our immune systems produce to fight invading pathogens, but autoantibodies are produced when the immune system mistakenly identifies its’ own tissue as the foreign invader. Auto = Self. This is what happen in autoimmune disease. Being an auto-immune condition, auto-antibodies are raised in Coeliac Disease, and studies have shown the same auto-antibodies to be present in renal disease.

https://www.karger.com/Article/PDF/13497

What are the main threats to our internal environment?

  • Overuse of antibiotics and mediations
  • Stress
  • Chemicals in our food, water and environment
  • Pathogenic bacteria from food water and the environment
  • Poor diet
  • Genetics
  • Methods of birth and infant feeding

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5483960/

 

In Conclusion…

As with CD, the incidence of end stage kidney disease is on the increase globally, the underlying causes of which are still largely unknown. Many other chronic, autoimmune and immune related conditions are also on the rise. There are of course theories which speculate on this phenomenon, such as industrialisation, the hygiene hypothesis, overuse of antibiotics, the quality and preparation of the modern diet, stress and infections to name a few, but at the end of the day there are no definitive answers and therefore no definitive solutions.

With the growing body of evidence linking the gut to a myriad of health conditions, looking after our internal ecosystem seems like a pretty logical place to start in preventative health and disease management though. Don’t you agree?

http://www.worldgastroenterology.org/publications/e-wgn/e-wgn-expert-point-of-view-articles-collection/the-global-village-of-celiac-disease-and-its-evolution-over-time

 

 

Seven Simple Home Remedies that can Help Stop the Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

The purpose of this article is to share some simple strategies that can prevent CKD leading to kidney failure and the need for dialysis. But to understand how to stop the kidneys from deteriorating, we first need to be clear about what CKD actually is…

“Kidney Disease” – Quite simply, the kidneys have become damaged and cannot perform their function of filtering the blood properly.

“Chronic” – this means the condition worsens over a period of time.

So, that is the bad news, but you already knew that, right? Well, the good news is that if we understand the causes and risk factors of CKD, we can then modify these, potentially even removing them from the picture… and in the process stop the progression of CKD!

Now, there can be many causes of CKD, but there are some conditions that can increase the risk of developing it or increase the risk of existing CKD leading to kidney failure. Even if you do not suffer any of these conditions now, developing one of the following conditions will put your kidneys under more pressure. If you do suffer from one or more of these conditions, or if you have a family history of any of them, it is even more important that you continue reading this article. So here are the big three risk factors:

  • High blood pressure
  • Diabetes (Type 1 or 2) or insulin resistance
  • Heart disease

These are three of the most common health issues in developed countries today and are rapidly increasing in developing countries as well. What is even more worrying is that as well as becoming more prevalent, they are beginning to appear earlier in life.

Before I tell you about to remedies the stop the progression of kidney disease though, it needs to be said that all modern chronic diseases such as the ones listed above are largely preventable through diet, nutrition and exercise, and it is NEVER too late to make improvements to our behaviours around how we eat and exercise… but that is not what I want to talk about today.

It may be that your genetics, your current state of health, or your continued diet and lifestyle choices are predisposing you to these conditions, and this is certainly true for chronic kidney disease. In other words, having CKD means you are more likely to develop high blood pressure, diabetes or heart disease, but developing any of these conditions first can increase the likelihood of developing kidney disease if you are genetically predisposed. This goes to show just how important it is to use preventative strategies to avoid these common health complications.

Adjust your diet and lifestyle by all means! But there are extra measures you can easily incorporate into your daily life if you are serious about taking control of your health and preventing or stopping the progression of CKD.

I know how hard it can be to change habits, but it is likely that there are things you are doing in your daily life that are contributing to the risk of developing high blood pressure, diabetes and heart disease… after all, that is why these conditions are becoming so prevalent, because our modern dietary and lifestyle choices do not match our ancient genes.

We are always being told to add exercise, add medication, add supplements, add stress reduction techniques… all the changes are enough to cause more stress! So, to make it easier to adopt these remedies into daily life, I have researched the best ones that we can all use to REPLACE our current detrimental habits with ones that improve our health. You do not need to use all of these remedies every day, but next time you reach for a cup of coffee, make a conscious effort to replace it with one of the remedies I am about to share with you.

These are time proven, well documented, simple daily practices that will have you feeling better, strengthen your immune system, reduce inflammation and stop the decline of your health. When incorporated into a healthy diet and lifestyle, they can stop the progression of chronic kidney disease.

 

The Remedies

When you wake up, your body should be well rested, but it has gone around eight or more hours without any water! Hydrating your cells is the first thing you should do when you wake up. But there are simple ways you can turn a glass of water into a simple yet powerful remedy to nourish your body and support your kidneys.

Now we all know water is important, but when our kidneys are struggling, we do not want to add any extra pressure. Do not be in a hurry and do not feel you need to flood your body first thing in the morning. On a side note, please try to drink filtered water so that you are not adding any more chemicals or pathogens for your body to deal with.

 

1. Apple Cider Vinegar (unfiltered)

 This is an age-old remedy that has regained some status in recent years. Many people have this in their pantry already; if not, it is widely available in health food stores, supermarkets and even some pharmacies. Make sure it is unfiltered though, as it is the cloudy sediment, also known as “the mother”, that provides the health benefits of ACV.

Baked Quinoa and Broccoli Frittata

Hello! Today I like to share with you a healthy and delicious recipe that not only will make your taste buds sing, but will also be protective of your kidney function and help support tissue alkalinity.

I know for many eating a healthy kidney diet can be the struggle, and so I hope this recipe can be another tool in your toolbox in beating kidney disease.

Baked Quinoa and Broccoli Frittata

This quick and easy dish provides an interesting twist on your common frittata.

Quinoa is a South American staple and is one of the few alkaline “grains” (technically it is a seed).  If you are sure what quinoa is or how to cook with it, don’t worry, if you can cook with rice, then you can cook with quinoa.

This recipes strengths lie in the fact it is gluten and dairy free, and soundly alkaline – all three being an important factor in maintain kidney health. Being “gluten free” is particularly important for those with IgA Nephropathy as it helps reduce the load on the immune system. Gluten is an “aggravator” to the immune system.

Alrightly, without further ado, here is your recipe for the day…

Ingredients (serves 4)

• 1 cup quinoa (measure before cooked)
• 2 cups broccoli florets
• ½ teaspoon celtic sea salt
• ¼ teaspoon crushed pepper
• 1 ½ cups soymilk
• 4 eggs
• Lemon wedge (optional)

Directions

1.   Preheat the oven to 180°C and brush a casserole dish with a thin layer of olive oil.
2.   Place the quinoa in a saucepan with 2 cups of water over medium heat and simmer for 15 minutes. Add the celtic sea salt while the quinoa is cooking. Most of the liquid should have disappeared after 15 minutes.
3.   Once cooked, stir through the quinoa, place the broccoli on top and turn off the cooker, leaving the saucepan on top.
4.   While the quinoa is cooking beat the eggs in a mixing bowl. Mix in the pepper and soymilk.
5.   Place the cooked quinoa in the casserole dish and cover with the egg and soymilk mixture. Bake for up to 45 minutes, removing from the oven when the dish has browned on top.
6.   Once cooked, sit the dish for 10 minutes and then cut into slices and serve.
Optional: Squeeze fresh lemon juice on top to your taste preference.

Nutritional Analysis (per serving)

  • Potassium: 531mg
  • Protein: 16g
  • Phosphorus: 361mg
  • Sodium: 419mg

This dish is great as it does not involve too many ingredients and is relatively simple to make. The other great thing is that it keeps well for a couple of the days, so you can enjoy the next day for lunch too!

Also don’t be shy in playing around with the flavours of this dish, add some spices, or chopped vegetables to make it even a bigger hit (e.g. mushrooms).

Please let me know in the comments section below how you get on with this kidney recipe; if you enjoyed it; and possibly ways to even make it better – though anything with broccoli for me is a winner (I’m a bit of a broccoli fiend.)

Thank you once again for stopping by, and look forward to chatting with you next week.

And don’t forget, if you have enjoyed this article, please click the “LIKE” or Share buttons below to show your support (They’re my kind of currency 🙂!)

One Simple Cooking Herb May Reverse Oxidative Kidney Damage

ginger alcohol oxidative kidney damageWe’ve all cooked with it, added it to a veggie juice, or had it as a warming soothing tea. But now the scientists at the Sri Venkateswara University in India (Molecular Biology division) have taken it one step further and started running extensive tests on this humble herb. This humble herb you know as Ginger, and it has been shown to have positive and remarkable effects in the treatment and management of alcohol induced renal oxidative damage. Who would have thunk it?

It is well known that herbal medicines can help protect the kidneys, reverse kidney damage, and assist in the management and reduction of symptoms – there are literally umpteen herbs to choose from. But ginger, before this study, has not really been regarded as one of them (traditional chinese medicine has used ginger to varying degrees for kidney complaints, but in a limited capacity compared to other herbal medicines).

The study led by Shanmugam Ramdudu PhD, together with five other scientists, set out to investigate the renal protective effects of ginger against alcohol-induced oxidative stress and tissue damage. Knowing that alcohol consumption is widespread across the world, causing many diseases, and the over production of oxidative stress, the scientists considered what impact this may have on the kidneys (a major detoxifying organ), and if the herb ginger may lend a solution to this problem.

The scientists decided on ginger as they had recently completed a study proving its benefits for protecting the liver. Not only this, but in recent times ginger has been subject to countless other studies for the treatment and management of diseases, such as: cataracts, stroke, rheumatism, diabetes, neural disorders, and asthma!

The Scientific Method

The scientists used twenty four Wistar rats (aged 6 months) to conduct the study, which were divided up into four distinct groups:
1.    Normal control group (Nc): feed a normal diet
2.    Ginger treated group (Gt): given a ginger extract (equiv. 200mg/kg body weight) everyday for 30 days
3.    Alcohol treated group (At): given 20% alcohol (equiv. 2g/kg body weight) everyday for 30 days
4.    Alcohol plus ginger treated group (At + Gt): alcohol and ginger in the same dosages described above, everyday for 30 days. Alcohol was given first, followed by the ginger extract 5 minutes later.

Immediately after the final dosage, the scientists measured the following parameters: superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidise (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR); all powerful antioxidants enzymes used by the body to quench free radical damage and protect the kidneys.

The Results

The following is a summary of the impressive results attained:

Kidney Diet – The Best Diet for Kidney Disease Sufferers?

kidney diet

Hey Guys!

I just finished my first experiment with video! I have been meaning to do this for A-G-E-S and now I have finally done it!

I have posted my 9 minute presentation on YouTube (which discusses the best kidney diet for kidney disease), placed it on here, and now I urge you to go check it out (wanting to use a “!” so badly right now).

In this presentation I discuss the benefits of an alkaline diet in kidney disease, and how this small change can have a massive impact to your kidney health.

Please let me know what you think of it, in fact, I would be so grateful if you could watch over on YouTube itself (click here to watch: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hIapd1INkvc), place a comment on it, and then subscribe to my youtube.com channel – that way I feel the love, which keeps me posting great content, and you will receive this information directly so you never miss a beat.

I plan to produce a lot more of these over the coming months, so if you have any tips, ideas, or comments please let me know.

Again, simply click on the YouTube button directly below and leave your comments and subscribe to my youtube channel… Enjoy!

kidney diet - youtube video

Until next time, take care!

Duncan

 

 

Please note: before under taking any new kidney diet, please make sure you speak to your health care professional first. It is wise, especially with this kidney diet, that your potassium levels are assessed.

 

kidney diet